Prof. Marom Bikson gives two invited talk at the International Neuromodulation Society meeting in Edinburgh May 27-30.  Conference details link

May 27, 2017 “Toward Markers of Target Engagement in tDCS” in the pre-conference on Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation.

Download slides talk 1: Bikson_INS_2017finalA.compressed

May 29, 2017 “Mechanistic Questions around High-Rate Stimulation and Overview of Methods for Reliable Electrophysiological Recording During High-Rate (10k) Stimulation” in breakout session Mechanisms and Models of High-rate Electrical Stimulation (chaired by Dr. Bikson)

Download slides talk 2:29-1430-BIKSON-BREAKOUT_Fd.compressed

The Science of Consciousness June 5-10, 2017 La Jolla, California

‘The Science of Consciousness’ (‘TSC’) is an interdisciplinary conference on all aspects of the nature of conscious experience, awareness, feelings and existence. How does the brain produce consciousness? Is consciousness intrinsic to the universe, or an epiphenomenal illusion? How can consciousness causally affect brain processes? What are the best empirical theories? Do we have free will? How did life and consciousness originate and evolve? What are the origins of moral and aesthetic values? How can we improve mental, physical and cognitive function? Can consciousness persist after bodily death, e.g. through ‘uploading’ to machines, or via mental processes tied to the natural world?

For registration, hotel and other information see: http://www.consciousness.arizona.edu

Marom Bikson, CCNY/CUNY, ‘Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Devices to Change Thought and Behavior’

June 6: PL4 2:00 to 4:10 pm Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation

The CCNY Neural Engineering group is excited for two important papers on the mechanisms of tDCS published in the same issue of Brain Stimulation journal.

Direct Current Stimulation Modulates LTP and LTD: Activity Dependence and Dendritic Effects.  

Kronberg G, Bridi M, Abel T, Bikson M, Parra LC.
Brain Stimul. 2017 Jan – Feb;10(1):51-58. doi: 10.1016/j.brs.2016.10.001. Epub 2016 Oct 5. PMID: 28104085

Download PDF: Kronberg_DCS

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Direct Current Stimulation Alters Neuronal Input/Output Function.

Lafon B, Rahman A, Bikson M, Parra LC.
Brain Stimul. 2017 Jan – Feb;10(1):36-45. doi: 10.1016/j.brs.2016.08.014. Epub 2016 Sep 1.PMID: 27717601

Download PDF: Lafon_DCS

The SF Giants Are Zapping Their Brains With Electricity. Will It Help? MAY 8, 2017

link

“People like to say that electricity is the currency of the brain and that in many ways the brain is a circuit,” says Marom Bikson, a professor of biomedical engineering at City College of New York. “So when we apply electricity to the brain, we interact with that circuit, and we can change how that circuit works.”

Jackson MP, Truong D, Brownlow ML, Wagner JA, McKinley RA, Bikson M, Jankord R. Safety parameter considerations of anodal transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in rats.  Brain, Behavior, and Immunity 2017 pii: S0889-1591(17)30110-1. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2017.04.008 Jankord_Safety_tDCS_2017

Nitsche M. Bikson M. Extending the parameter range for tDCS: Safety and tolerability of 4 mA stimulation. Brain Stimulation. Editorial, Volume 10, Issue 3, Pages 541–542, 2017 Nitche_Bikson_BrainStim_2017

And don’t forget our seminal 2016 safety review here

April 7, 2017. 11:00 am to 12:30 pm, 333 Curry Student Center, Northeastern University, Boston

“Translational Neural Engineering: Accelerated medical device design for treatment of neuro-psychiatric disorders and brain injury”

The design and clinical deployment of new medical devices on an accelerated time scale (as little at 6 months) requires an interdisciplinary team and skill set spanning basic science, biomedical engineering, regulatory, and clinical trials. This talk uses a series of case-studies to diagram a process for rapid translational medical device design, with a focus on non-invasive electrical stimulation technology. This generalizable medical design process is translational because basic science stages are already informed by regulatory and clinical challenges, while clinical trials are designed around engineering features and limitations.

Slides: BiksonDesign

Remotely Supervised Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Increases the Benefit of At-Home Cognitive Training in Multiple Sclerosis

Neuromodulation. 2017 Feb 22. doi: 10.1111/ner.12583. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 28225155

Leigh Charvet, PhD; Michael Shaw, BS; Bryan Dobbs, MS; Ariana Frontario, BS; Kathleen Sherman, MS; Marom Bikson, PhD; Abhishek Datta, PhD; Lauren Krupp, MD; Esmail Zeinapour, MS; Margaret Kasschau, BS

Full paper PDF: 10.1111@ner.12583

Objective: To explore the efficacy of remotely-supervised transcranial direct current stimulation (RS-tDCS) paired with cognitive training (CT) exercise in participants with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: In a feasibility study of RS-tDCS in MS, participants completed ten sessions of tDCS paired with CT (1.5 mA 3 20 min, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex montage). RS-tDCS participants were compared to a control group of adults with MS who underwent ten 20-min CT sessions through the same remotely supervised procedures. Cognitive outcomes were tested by composite scores measuring change in performance on standard tests (Brief International Cognitive Assessment in MS or BICAMS), basic attention (ANT-I Orienting and Attention Networks, Cogstate Detection), complex attention (ANT-I Executive Network, Cogstate Identification and One-Back), and intra-individual response variability (ANT-I and Cogstate identification; sensitive markers of disease status). Results: After ten sessions, the tDCS group (n 5 25) compared to the CT only group (n 5 20) had significantly greater improvement in complex attention (p 5 0.01) and response variability (p 5 0.01) composites. The groups did not differ in measures of basic attention (p 5 0.95) or standard cognitive measures (p 5 0.99). Conclusions: These initial findings indicate benefit for RS-tDCS paired with CT in MS. Exploratory analyses indicate that the earliest tDCS cognitive benefit is seen in complex attention and response variability. Telerehabilitation using RS-tDCS combined with CT may lead to improved outcomes in MS.